How do you think social media is affecting the sport of football?

In November, Alex Kotler of Football Partnerships is putting on a rockin’ panel to discuss how social media is affecting the sport of football, and yours truly has been invited as a panelist. (I’m super honored/excited to be a part of this! Details below.)

So I’m calling on all my Social Media gurus out there to help me prep! How do you think social media is affecting the sport of football? Got a quick answer? Tweet me! Need more than 140 characters? Email me or drop a comment below.

Also, it’s an invitation-only event, but certainly send an email to Alex if you want to become a partner of the event! If you’ll be in Mahattan & are a member of Football Partnerships, RSVP to come to the party reception afterward.

Big thanks to Jack Huckel (@JRH46 on Twitter), NSCAA Secretary and Director of Museum and Archives for the National Socer Hall of Fame, for connecting me with Alex earlier this summer. And in addition to all the wonderful sponsors of this event, a special shout out to Tim Horton at Soccer Interactive, a community of coaches, parents & players that contribute to and enrich the learning process, for supporting Football Partnerships as well.

Check out Football Partnerships!

TWEET! Blowing the Whistle on Social Media

Football Partnerships is pleased to announce TWEET! Blowing the Whistle on Social Media, a panel discussion presented by Football Partnerships, in assocation with the European Football Group. This by-invitation-only event will cover how social networking is impacting the business of soccer.

Featured panelists include: Greg Lalas, Editor of Goal.com Magazine, Chris Schlosser, Director of Digital Strategy at Soccer United Marketing, Chris Toy, Creator of football comic Studs Up, Amanda Vandervort, Web Coordinator at WPS and Ethan Zohn, co-Founder of Grassroot Soccer (subject to availability). Alex Kotler, Founder of Football Partnerships, will serve as moderator.

Fifteen select delegates will be invited to attend the function, which is FREE. However, each delegate will make a donation to Grassroot Soccer.

Football Partnerships thanks Major League Soccer, Soccer United Marketing and Nelson Rodriguez for inviting us to host this event at such a prestigious venue.

All New York area members are invited to join us afterward for a reception at a nearby location.

6 thoughts on “How do you think social media is affecting the sport of football?

  1. Social media has been brilliant for athletes in general. It’s just such a very authentic medium to connect with fans on their terms, rather than, say, while they are out eating dinner with the family. Plus, the European-based players like Freddy Adu, Charlie Davies and Maurie Edu, have an easy way to keep their fans informed.

    For football in the U.S. in particular, it has the potential to be a game changer. With social media, football fans can easily connect with each other and new football fans can easily learn more about the game and find like-minded individuals on Facebook, Twitter, etc. You can find blogs – in English – on pretty much every club side in the world. It might prove that football doesn’t need the coverage fans thinks it deserves because they can provide the coverage themselves via these platforms.

  2. From Twitter: @socialmediainfo: @vandey01 – Not sure how this is changing football but I find it crazy that @beckham has more than 72k followers and doesn’t even use it.

  3. From Twitter: @justjen @vandey01 w/no question it’s an adjunct for the lack of coverage of women’s soccer around the world. I’m more informed now than ever before.

  4. Social media has brought results into real time no matter what the match, no matter what the league, no matter what the country you can find find the score.

    What usually follows the reporting of the score is a statment that identifies ones allegiance and then the fun begins.

    Connecting fans across the globe is for me the most wonderful part of social media.

    Joe Cummings
    CEO and Executive Director
    National Soccer Coaches Association of America

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